Thursday, April 2, 2015

"Salinger," the documentary. Many unasked and unanswered questions.

Salinger (2013) Poster

6 comments:

  1. You know who should make a documentary about Salinger? You. Asking all the right questions, bringing up all the best points. Thank you!

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  2. Aren't you sweet--but alas, I am not a filmmaker. I have no idea how to do that, though I am full of too many ideas. Thanks for reading. Best, Elizabeth

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  3. Excellent insights about the psychology. I too look forward to reading the World War 2 material. Thanks for this!

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  4. Thanks, Ruthanne. I believe the psychology here is what it's all about; it's the point. Best, EC

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  5. Do you think there is a narcissism to Salinger's work? I always got that feeling. Or maybe it isn't just that (I think that because of his long-term Glass family obsession, which I don't share); maybe it's that he acted like he was too good for the rest of the publishing scene?

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  6. Oh, yes, I think any writer can be (and often is) accused of narcissism, simply for daring to write what he or she knows. Obviously, Salinger didn't know the Glass family, because they are fictional, but I do find it odd how much mental energy and how many pages he devoted to that family tree. As for acting "too good"--well I was surprised, in an unpleasant way, to learn from "Salinger" that the author did not like to speak to or encourage other writers. Writing is a very hard business, and we all need mentors and networks. There is the perpetual worry about lack, when one is a writer, and jealousy, etc. I try to guard against both feelings, as they are pointless and self-defeating. But they are there. I wonder if Salinger felt them? He had no need to, certainly.

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